Queen increases security after being warned that the royal family is a “high risk target”

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The 95-year-old queen has spent much of last year making video calls to hold engagements and chatting with Prince Harry and Meghan Markle from across the pond as a result of the pandemic.

Hackers and cybercriminals, who pose a threat to the security of the royal household, have increasingly worried the royal family.

Her Majesty’s cybersecurity experts have stated in a report that the risk of unauthorized access to the king’s data has increased.

Sir Michael Stevens, Keeper of the Privy Purse, is the one who warned the Queen in writing.



The 95-year-old queen has spent much of the year making video calls over the past year

The warning is intended to point out crooks in China and Russia who pose the most prominent threat.

He says the effects of hacking would be: “Reputation damage, penalties and / or legal action against the household or employees.”

Fears have risen after the US-based Colonial Pipeline was forced to pay a £ 3 million ransom after a hacking attack in May.



Image of the queen with a green hat and matching blazer / jacket
Her Majesty’s cybersecurity experts have said the risk of unauthorized access to the king’s data has increased

Royal sources say cybersecurity staff training is of a high standard and action has always been taken.

The defense was reinforced based on expert advice rather than a specific incident.

In 2015, Oxford University Professor Sadie Creese was hired to teach the Queen and the late Prince Philip on social media safety.



Image of Kate Middleton and Prince William
The royal household, like many others, has relied on technology to keep in touch during the pandemic

With royals increasing reliance on technology to keep in touch, especially during the pandemic, cybersecurity is now a major concern for them.

In May of this year, MailOnline reported that the royal household had advertised a cybersecurity expert worth £ 60,000 a year to keep them safe from hacking.

Earlier this year, the Queen named Elliot Atkins as Chief Information Security Officer, a newly created role in preventing online attacks.



Her Majesty's picture in yellow
Hackers and cybercriminals who pose a threat to the security of the royal household have made the royal family increasingly worrisome

Prior to this appointment, former MI5 chief Andrew Parker was named Lord Chamberlain of the royal household.

The Cabinet Office has followed this trend too, as it was revealed that it had spent nearly £ 300,000 on cybersecurity training.

According to the political think tank Parliament Street, the courses included The Art of Hacking, Digital Forensics Fundamentals, and Ethical Hacking.



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